Tonight in Seattle:  

SIFF 2015: Week Three Highlights

Beti and Amare

A harrowing Korean sea thriller, a sultry sapphic summer romance from Lithuania, and a gorgeous Ethiopian genre mashup are among your best bets during SIFF 2015's final (!) week and weekend (5/29 - 6/7).

DON'T MISS:

Beti and Amare
{5/29 1:45p Uptown}
Intriguing 1930s-set genre pastiche about a young Ethopian woman trying to live a normal life while avoiding Mussolini's troops and local thugs. It's a supernatural romance, existential drama, and revenge thriller all in one. It's also dreamy in the best possible way, with a visual style that frequently stuns.

Haemoo
{5/29 8:30p Lincoln Square}
Horrifying, often punishingly intense sea thriller co-written and produced by innovative Korean genre genius Bong Joon-ho (Snowpiercer, Mother). Even when the psychosis-tinged narrative develops a nasty case of sea-sickness -- and boy, does it ever -- Haemoo sinks spectacularly. Bring the Dramamine.

Mr. Holmes
{5/29 7p Uptown, 5/31 4p Pacific Place}
Ian McKellen plays an elderly Sherlock Holmes in the late 1940s (and, in many time-toggling flashbacks, as early as the late 1910s), living a quiet countryside life with his housekeeper (Laura Linney) and her inquisitive young son. In revisiting an unsolved case he worked on toward the end of his investigative glory days, Mr. Holmes confronts the difficulties of aging, of his roles in various fictions, and of (not always) remembering. Entertaining throughout, even when the performances teeter into hammy territory.

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Latest comment by: Roxie Rider: "

Wonderful reviews, sir. I'm especially eager to see Mr. Holmes. It sounds fascinating.

"

SIFF Interview: 5 Questions (+5 Photos) with Kevin Bacon

Kevin Bacon on the SIFF 2015 Red Carpet for Cop Car

Three Imaginary Girls got to hit the red carpet last night for An Evening with Kevin Bacon and the premiere of Cop Car at the Seattle International Film Festival with Director Jon Watts & star Kevin Bacon in attendance!! !!! !!! I was somehow able to keep my cool (but just barely) while asking him 5 very important questions.

TIG: If YOU had a cop car, would you leave your keys in it?
Kevin Bacon: Noooo! Definitely not; worst decision ever. He’s [Sherriff Kretzer; Bacon’s character in Cop Car] trying to be cool, but he obviously hasn’t really given it a lot of thought.

TIG: Who would win in a fight: Ryan Hardy [from The Following] or Sherriff Kretzer?
KB: I think Ryan Hardy. Yeah. I think he’s got some moves that the Sherriff doesn’t even know about.

More questions and photos after the jump ...

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Latest comment by: imaginary embracey: "

So cool!

"

SIFF Take: A Brilliant Young Mind

“If beauty is truth and truth beauty, then maths must be the most beautiful thing in the world.”

A pastiche of gorgeous, even sumptuous color and pattern nevertheless maintains a slight emotional buffer, a thin and transparent but ever-present barrier between beauty and the sensation of experiencing that beauty. Drops of red, red blood—redder than a stop light or the red lorry that runs it—retain a rare, fragile beauty, even as it’s clear what they represent. The camera often settles just shy of the expected distance, or just a little too close or too far too the side, and we see things, maybe, perhaps at least a bit, the way Nathan does. Nathan’s a math genius, and on the spectrum. But A Brilliant Young Mindis not a triumph-of-the-savant film, and it’s not about colors. Plot-wise, in fact, it’s pleasantly familiar. Nathan (Asa Butterfield, best known from Hugo) convenes with a veritable nerd convention—musical, mathematical, acerbic, semi-cool, insufferable, autistic, and garden-variety—to pursue a slot at the Internationals Math Olympics. They, and the adults around them, go through their sometimes routine, sometimes extraordinary days trying to figure out how to navigate relationships when relationships are far more inscrutable than the math problems they’re bent on solving.

{A Brilliant Young Mind screens at SIFF 5/28, at 4pm at The Harvard Exit.} 

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SIFF Take: Circle

Circle is a Sci-Fi social experiment where a group of people fleeing an alien invasion awaken to find themselves locked inside a room with a giant circular dial in the middle. It takes them a little bit of time to realize that each of them are “voting” to pick who will die. After discussing their options (of which there aren’t many; you choose who dies or you might be next), good and bad traits are revealed and cliques form in a battle for survival.

I wasn’t sure what to think about this film when it first began—spending 87 minutes in one room with the same people seemed like it might be a bit much, but I gotta give props to the filmmakers; it actually seemed just right. The cast is diverse and not entirely unrecognizable (hi Julie Benz!); something which suits the mood of the movie really well. All in all, I thought Circle was a good, suspenseful way to spend my viewing time.

{Circle screens at SIFF 5/28, 9pm—screening on standby—and again 5/29, 1:15pm at SIFF Cinema Uptown. Directors Aaron Hann & Mario Miscione are scheduled to attend both screenings} 

SIFF 2015 Recommendation: ALL THE KEVIN BACON THINGS

Footloose 1984

In case it’s not obvious, I am a huge fan of Kevin Bacon. A large part of this is because of Footloose, sure, because that movie came out right when I discovered dancing was the thing I loved to do the most—and HELLO: Ren McCormack was/is a stone cold fox. Plus: BEST SOUNDTRACK EVER. So good that I wore out my cassette tape in 1984… not once, but twice. But nevermind my Ren-obsession: Bacon is straight-up one of the best actors out there, and I never miss a chance to see him do his thing on screen. 

If you feel the same way I do, you can’t miss the double-feature of 80's classics screening this Tuesday, May 26 at SIFF Cinema Egyptian: Diner & Footloose. The next night (Weds May 27) is An Evening with Kevin Bacon, including a screening of his latest film: Cop Car.

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