Tonight in Seattle:  

The German Doctor

{The German Doctor opens in Seattle on Friday, 5/23 and is screening at Sundance Cinemas Seattle & Lincoln Square Cinemas} 

Eeeesh. From the moment you see Àlex Brendemühl appear on film as German SS Officer Josef Mengele in The German Doctor, you get the wigs. While hiding in South America, Mengele meets a family traveling to re-open an inherited hotel + a doll factory (what), and takes a creep-tastic interest in their 12-year-old daughter Lilith. Although it’s not the type of creep you might expect; the doctor is actually interested in using Lilith to continue the human genetic experiments he was running at Auschwitz. Like I said, EEEESH.

Things get even worse when he finds out Lilith’s mom is pregnant with twins, and Mengele realizes he can experiment on them too, injecting the same “hormone growth serum” he’s been giving Lilith into one of the babies in utero, and doing god-knows-what-else to the other. DOUBLE EEESH. Weirdly, mom and daughter don’t seem to think there’s anything wrong with the doctor giving them both injections, or with him keeping a extremely detailed journal filled with sketches punctuated by “scientific notes.” 

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SIFF Review: Willow Creek

Willow Creek SIFF 2014

Holycrap, you guys. I was not expecting to get completely and totally sucked in by Willow Creek, especially because Director Bobcat Goldthwait has been calling it, “The Blair Squatch Project.” But 10 minutes in, I was ALL in, and even though the premise is ridiculously goofy, the film itself falls firmly in the horror genre.

The ridiculously goofy premise is this: Jim (Bryce Johnson) and his girlfriend Kelly (Alexie Gilmore) take a road trip to the site of the Patterson-Gimlin film footage in search of Bigfoot. It’s clear up front that Kelly isn’t a believer and that even though Jim might kinda-sorta want to believe, this is more about a fun birthday weekend for him that fulfills his childhood dream. Jim’s brought along a camera with plans to film the entire trip as a documentary of their findings, frequently turning it on himself and Kelly and interviewing local townspeople on the way to their end destination.

You’re set up right from the start to watch this as a comedy, because there’s no way freaking Bigfoot could be scary, right?

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Latest comment by: imaginary rich: "

+1 on Willow Creek. I also didn't expect much of this one, but for different reasons. I just wasn't a fan of other recent Goldthwait stuff. Though I wasn't entirely up ont the found footage aspect either. Regardless it worked for all the reasons ...

SIFF Take: 1,000 Times Good Night

1,000 Times Good Night might be described as “the SIFF’iest movie ever.” Juliette Binoche plays Rebecca, a photojournalist who specializes in shining the light on the world’s conflict zones, and who can’t seem to reconcile her home life and her job life—even after a life-threatening accident that occurs by putting herself in the line of fire.

In the achingly beautiful and horrific opening sequence, Rebecca is photographing a female suicide bomber when it’s detonated earlier than expected and ends up fracturing her rib. Even terrified and in pain, she picks herself up and clicks the shutter, capturing the aftermath before passing out and waking up in the hospital. Shell-shocked, Rebecca returns home to two daughters she barely knows because of all the time she spends away and a husband (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) weary of waiting for news of her death.

Director Erik Poppe fills the screen with haunting imagery and relies more on Binoche’s incredible ability to emote than dialog, which fits the mood of the film perfectly. And although at times the story seemed unsurprising, the end really packs a punch. There are lots of layers to unfold here, both personal and political.

{1,000 Times Good Night screens at SIFF on 5/23, 7pm at The Harvard Exit, and again 5/25, 4:15pm at AMC Pacific Place}

Latest comment by: imaginary amie: "She definitely elevated what could have been a typical indie movie into something with MUCH more impact. The middle seemed very typical, and easy to figure out -- but the beginning and end, coupled with her amazing performance make this one worth your time. "

SIFF Take: Lucky Them

The complete opposite of the devastating Eden (SIFF, 2012), Lucky Them is a part comedy, part “eesh, I can identify with that” romance, but not exactly in the traditional sense of the word. Toni Collette completely kills it (like she does every. single. time. Yes, even in Hostages) as Ellie Klug, a Seattle music journalist employed at fictional magazine STAX, whose editor demands she find out what happened to her missing rock-God ex-boyfriend as the anniversary of his influential album approaches. As a reluctant Ellie starts her assignment, she runs into two men that complicate the task: Lucas Stone (Ryan Eggold): a talented, and uh, very good looking, young musician, and Charlie (Thomas Hayden-Church), a rich acquaintance who offers to finance her search in exchange for filming it.

Side note: how much would I love it if Oliver Platt actually ran a music magazine in this city? The answer is SO MUCH. So, so, so much.

While I admit imaginary embracey’s comments about some of the details of her job being fantasy-based are correct, it didn’t bug me much because of my instant connection to the character. Don’t misunderstand me; I’m not trying to claim that I have anywhere near the level of journalistic fame or skill that Ellie does in the film, I’m just saying: a female writer who hooks up with all the wrong people and pines after a long-lost love to the point where it sabotages her current relationships? That hits close (probably a little too close) to home. Also adding to the authenticity: I feel like I’ve met every single character in this movie multiple times. The first thing that occurred to me when Charlie appears on screen was, “Oh man. I meet that guy at every SIFF Opening Night party, every single year.”

Short story: I love this one as much as I love The Off Hours and Eden. It’s a completely different kind of love, but it’s still love. My heart is yours once again, Ms. Griffiths.

{Lucky Them screens at SIFF on 5/22, 7pm at the Renton IKEA Performing Arts Center for Renton Opening Night, and again on 5/23, 9:15pm at The Egyptian. Director Megan Griffiths & Writer Emily Wachtel are scheduled to attend both screenings} 

SIFF Review: We Are the Best!

If you’re free for some SIFFIng at 4:30 today, I’ve got one to recommend highly. We Are the Best! follows 3 teenage girls through roughly a school year in 1982 Stockholm. Despite the age of its protagonists—13, all—and the fact that instruments are involved, it’s not really about Growing Up, or Finding Your Voice, or even Putting On The Best Show Ever. It’s not there to judge teens (“Whatever happened to respect, young lady?”) or deify them (Bueller? Bueller?) or hold them up as adorably limited or precocious mini-humans so we can all be glad we’re past that. Director Lukas Moodysson (Lilya 4-ever) treats teenagers are interesting on their own terms, as characters who needn’t be conscripted as metaphors. It’s a poignant and insightful movie. With 13-year-old girls.

Bobo and Klara are best friends. Bobo is more inwardly drawn than Klara. She likes punk music—it makes her feel better—but she still has elephant-covered pillow cases. 

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