Tonight in Seattle:  

What’s happening in the land of Three Imaginary Girls?

Photo by Victoria VanBruinisse 2012

Dearest Imaginaries,

You may have noticed that our posts haven’t been happening with any regularity for quite some time. We want to assure you that we’re still here, and we still love all the same things we’ve always loved and want to share them with you—we’ve just been going through some (ch-ch-ch-ch-ch) changes.

Here are some details that will further illuminate you:

You might not believe it, but even a little endeavor like TIG hits the pocketbook hard, every month, and over the years that’s added up to a lot of cash to cover site hosting and developer time to fix scripts that are over our heads. We’re looking into ways to ask for help (more on that soon), and we also came up with this brilliant idea to switch TIG from its current format to a much more economically-friendly option.

Unfortunately, rather than the website-conversion/imaginary refresh taking a few months like we thought it would, it’s taken literally an entire year and we’re still not finished with all the tweaks and misc. things that need to happen before we deem the new site worthy of our amazing imaginary audience. RELATED: Oh hey, do you know a friendly neighborhood WordPress dev who’d want to chat with us over coffee? Ours is currently M.I.A.

In the meantime, we’ve been working real hard at our day jobs while also trying to port all the old content over to the new site and make it shiny, instead of focusing on sharing the awesome media we’ve been consuming since our absence. But trust us: WE WILL RE-EMERGE TRIUMPHANTLY VERY SOON.

We really, really, really want to keep TIG alive. ♥ Stay tuned for more updates!

So much love,
imaginary liz & imaginary amie

photo by: Victoria VanBruinisse (2012)

Peter Hook and the Light take on New Order classics

Peter Hook and the Light

Taking the stage to the iconic Kraftwerk song “Trans Europe Express”, Taking the stage to the iconic Kraftwerk song “Trans Europe Express”, Joy Division and New Order founding bassist Peter Hook remarked “you’re a long way from Macclesfield”, perhaps a nod to his Northern England beginnings and how far his musical life has managed to take him. Backed by The Light, who consists of Hook’s son Jack Bates on bass, Andy Pool on keyboards, Paul Kehoe on drums, and longtime collaborator David Potts on guitar, Hook and company started off the night covering a number of Joy Division classics. Opening the set with “Exercise One”, they transitioned to the 1978 single “Digital”, and later on to some of the better-known tracks like “Heart and Soul” and “Strange Days”. It seemed the crowd’s highlight of the Joy Division portion of the night was “Warsaw”, perhaps the loudest and most energetic song of the set. With no opening band, the Joy Division set seemed to serve as the warm up act and chronological starting point into to the night of New Order to come.


Feeling some Murder Vibes - and liking it

If you are one of those people who secretly spend the summer longing for the return of cloudy skies and drizzly rain, you want to know about the self-titled debut album from local duo Murder Vibes. Vocalist Peter Hanks and multi-instrumentalist Jordan Evans have created a dark, moody soundtrack equally suited to solitary strolls through soggy fallen leaves or dancing with strangers in darkened basements.

Like many debuts, this one wears its influences proudly on its sleeve, and Murder Vibes have drawn from some of the best. Imagine the dark spirit of Depeche Mode combined with M83’s beats and Nick Cave’s drama, all built on a solid foundation of post-millennium U2 and you’ll have a pretty near idea of what Murder Vibes are up to. (And really, it is striking how effectively Hanks evokes Bono - which is about the highest compliment I can give.)

The trick with dark and moody bedroom projects is that they don’t always translate well to the stage. We’ll have a chance to find out how well Murder Vibes does it at their album release show at Fred Wildlife Refuge on November 13 (NOTE: we originally had it as 11/11 - it is actually, for real, on 11/13 - huge apologies). That will be your first chance to buy the album as well, although the single “Not Alone Tonight” is available on bandcamp now.

You can watch the creepy teaser for that song after the cut below, or head over to their web page where the rest of their teasers are pretty funny. 


Latest comment by: Anonymous: "Show is 11/13, not 11/11."

Slowdive Returns Next Week with Special Guest Low

Slowdive, courtesy of Slowdive's Facebook Page

{Photo courtesy of Slowdive's Facebook page}

It has been twenty-one years since Slowdive last performed in Seattle in August of 1993, where they were supporting that year's magnificent opus Souvlaki. Within a few years, Slowdive would no longer exist. In early 1995, the band released the equally compelling and experimental Pygmalion before being dropped almost immediately by Creation Records, a move that officially lowered the curtain on the group.

However, in the nineteen years that have passed, the members have remained impressively active. Neil Halstead and Rachel Goswell immediately moved on and started the much more organic and primarily acoustic Mojave 3, who released their first album, Ask Me Tomorrow, in 1995, and have been active ever since. Halstead and Goswell have also released solo records and been involved in various side projects over the years. Last year’s Stars Are Our Home by Halstead’s group Black Hearted Brother was the first chance to hear him perform psychedelic electric music since 1995.


Finally, a BellaMaine full-length

We got pretty excited about BellaMaine’s debut EP, Anxious Mind, last year. Five songs of their sweet-tart pop was a good start, but this week’s release of their self-titled album, Bellamaine, doesn’t come a moment too soon.